Mutual Funds

What is Mutual Fund?

It is a trust that collects money from a number of investors who share a common investment objective. Then, it invests the money in equities, bonds, money market instruments and/or other securities. Each investor owns units, which represent a portion of the holdings of the fund. The income/gains generated from this collective investment is distributed proportionately amongst the investors after deducting certain expenses, by calculating a scheme’s “Net Asset Value or NAV. Simply put, a Mutual Fund is one of the most viable investment options for the common man as it offers an opportunity to invest in a diversified, professionally managed basket of securities at a relatively low cost.

Why Do People Buy Mutual Funds?

Mutual funds are a popular choice among investors because they generally offer the following features:

Professional Management -The fund managers do the research for you. They select the securities and monitor the performance.

Diversification or “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” – Mutual funds typically invest in a range of companies and industries. This helps to lower your risk if one company fails.

Affordability – Most mutual funds set a relatively low dollar amount for initial investment and subsequent purchases.

Liquidity – Mutual fund investors can easily redeem their shares at any time, for the current net asset value (NAV) plus any redemption fees.

Mutual fund is a mechanism for pooling money by issuing units to the investors and investing funds in securities in accordance with objectives as disclosed in offer document. Investments in securities are spread across a wide cross-section of industries and sectors and thus the risk is diversified because all stocks may not move in the same direction in the same proportion at the same time. Mutual funds issue units to the investors in accordance with quantum of money invested by them. Investors of mutual funds are known as unitholders. The profits or losses are shared by investors in proportion to their investments. Mutual funds normally come out with a number of schemes which are launched from time to time with different investment objectives. A mutual fund is required to be registered with Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) before it can collect funds from the public.

The MUTUAL FUND SIP offers the following advantages

  • Disciplined investment approach
    Instead of investing large amounts sporadically, you achieve better results by investing smaller sums regularly. The MUTUAL FUND SIP ensures that you save some amount at least for the next 12-month period
  • Rupee cost averaging
    With MUTUAL FUND SIP you buy more units when the prices are low and fewer units when the prices are high. This results in averaging of cost per unit
  • Avoids sentiment-driven investments 
    By making you invest the same amount every month (or every quarter), the MUTUAL FUND SIP helps you avoid the common error of investing larger sums in bull markets (when the markets are at a high) and smaller sums in bear markets (when the markets are at a low)
  • Allows investments in small amounts 
    With a monthly investment of as little as INR1,000*, you can easily include the MUTUAL FUND SIP within your monthly budget, without altering your financial plans significantly
  • Convenience 
    You have the option of directly debiting your bank account for payments made towards the MUTUAL FUND SIP. All you need to do is give standing instructions once towards the same, and leave the rest to us

Schemes according to Maturity Period: A mutual fund scheme can be classified into open-ended scheme or close-ended scheme depending on its maturity period.

Open-ended Fund/Scheme An open-ended fund or scheme is one that is available for subscription and repurchase on a continuous basis. These schemes do not have a fixed maturity period. Investors can conveniently buy and sell units at Net Asset Value (NAV) per unit which is declared on a daily basis. The key feature of open-end schemes is liquidity.

Close-ended Fund/Scheme A close-ended fund or scheme has a stipulated maturity period e.g. 3-5 years. The fund is open for subscription only during a specified period at the time of launch of the scheme. Investors can invest in the scheme at the time of the new fund offer and thereafter they can buy or sell the units of the scheme on the stock exchanges where the units are listed. In order to provide an exit route to the investors, some close-ended funds give an option of selling back the units to the mutual fund through periodic repurchase at NAV related prices. SEBI Regulations stipulate that at least one of the two exit routes is provided to the investor i.e. either repurchase facility or through listing on stock exchanges.

Schemes according to Investment Objective: A scheme can also be classified as growth scheme, income scheme or balanced scheme considering its investment objective. Such schemes may be open-ended or close-ended schemes as described earlier. Such schemes may be classified mainly as follows:

Growth/Equity Oriented Scheme The aim of growth funds is to provide capital appreciation over the medium to long- term. Such schemes normally invest a major part of their corpus in equities. Such funds have comparatively high risks. These schemes provide different options to the investors like dividend option, growth, etc. and the investors may choose an option depending on their preferences. The investors must indicate the option in the application form. The mutual funds also allow the investors to change the options at a later date. Growth schemes are good for investors having a long-term outlook seeking appreciation over a period of time.

Income/Debt Oriented Scheme The aim of income funds is to provide regular and steady income to investors. Such schemes generally invest in fixed income securities such as bonds, corporate debentures, Government securities and money market instruments. Such funds are less risky compared to equity schemes. However, opportunities of capital appreciation are also limited in such funds. The NAVs of such funds are affected because of change in interest rates in the country. If the interest rates fall, NAVs of such funds are likely to increase in the short run and vice versa. However, long term investors may not bother about these fluctuations.

Balanced/Hybrid Scheme The aim of balanced schemes is to provide both growth and regular income as such schemes invest both in equities and fixed income securities in the proportion indicated in their offer documents. These are appropriate for investors looking for moderate growth. They generally invest 40-60% in equity and debt instruments. These funds are also affected because of fluctuations in share prices in the stock markets. However, NAVs of such funds are likely to be less volatile compared to pure equity funds.

Money Market or Liquid Schemes These schemes are also income schemes and their aim is to provide easy liquidity, preservation of capital and moderate income. These schemes invest exclusively in short-term instruments such as treasury bills, certificates of deposit, commercial paper and inter-bank call money, government securities, etc. Returns on these schemes fluctuate much less compared with other funds. These funds are appropriate for corporate and individual investors as a means to park their surplus funds for short periods.

Gilt Funds These funds invest exclusively in government securities. Government securities have no default risk. NAVs of these schemes also fluctuate due to change in interest rates and other economic factors as is the case with income or debt oriented schemes.

Index Funds Index Funds replicate the portfolio of a particular index such as the BSE Sensitive index (Sensex), NSE 50 index (Nifty), etc. These schemes invest in the securities in the same weightage comprising of an index. NAVs of such schemes would rise or fall in accordance with the rise or fall in the index, though not exactly by the same percentage due to some factors known as “tracking error” in technical terms. Necessary disclosures in this regard are made in the offer document of the mutual fund scheme

 

 

These schemes offer tax rebates to the investors under specific provisions of the Income Tax Act, 1961 as the Government offers tax incentives for investment in specified avenues, for example, Equity Linked Savings Schemes (ELSS) under section 80C and Rajiv Gandhi Equity Saving Scheme (RGESS) under section 80CCG of the Income Tax Act, 1961. Pension schemes launched by mutual funds also offer tax benefits. These schemes are growth oriented and invest pre-dominantly in equities. Their growth opportunities and risks associated are like any equity-oriented scheme.

An investor must mention clearly his name, address, number of units applied for and such other information as required in the application form. Know your Customer (KYC) documents need to be submitted by a first time investor.

TECHNOLOGY

We use the latest technology on the internet which helps us in delivering accurately and within minimal time to those who avail our services because we don’t compromise on the quality of our service.

Our mission

To deliver professional services at an economical rate and on timely basis because we value your precious time. We aim at helping small businesses to compete effectively in the market. We wish to be known by the quality of services we provide.

EXPERIENCE/ HISTORY

We have people who are very particular about there work ethic. In our entity, work comes first. We have staff who are highly qualified. We also run a CA firm from the past 30 years. 

COMPETITIVE EDGE

In general we have expertise in all our fields of work but our compliance work is what gives us an edge over the other companies. We are very thorough with our follow ups resulting in everything being done well in advance, thus avoiding unnecessary delay.